Recent Stories

advanced materials

Advancing SC workforce

September 19, 2017

The University of South Carolina has been preparing students for the workforce for generations. As the state has attracted more high-tech manufacturing operations, the need for more skilled workers has grown rapidly. The university can now increase its reach to help even more South Carolinians take advantage of these opportunities with a $20 million National Science Foundation grant.

home sweet home

Home sweet home

August 22, 2017, Megan Sexton

Meet the Carolinians who have turned their dreams of home into reality in unlikely ways, one converting a sprawling schoolhouse; another turning a warehouse into elegant living space. The third has taken Henry David Thoreau’s admonition “Simplify, simplify” to its logical conclusion, a home built on a philosophy of living that surpasses the physical dimensions of its walls.

mancke

Going dark

August 20, 2017, Chris Horn

Naturalist-in-residence Rudy Mancke has never witnessed a total solar eclipse, so he’s especially looking forward to the Aug. 21 event, not only to see what’s happening in the sky but to learn how it affects the animal life he’s studied for so long

Kevin Varner

Brew it yourself

August 15, 2017, Craig Brandhorst

Before he finished college, Kevin Varner, ’93, was working in a brewery. By his mid-20s, he had started one himself. Now, a quarter century later, the founder of Columbia’s Hunter-Gatherer Brewery and Ale House is back at it, opening a second brewery, this one so big you could fly a plane through the front door — or at least taxi in.

spencer

Mungo Undergraduate Teaching Award winner: Mindi Spencer

August 11, 2017, Megan Sexton

In her nine years at the University of South Carolina, Mindi Spencer has focused on adapting her teaching to better serve students’ needs. During that time, the Michael J. Mungo Undergraduate Teaching award winner says she has grown from an instructor into a teacher in the classroom, and from a teacher into a mentor outside the classroom walls.

ptsd

Cause and reflect

August 09, 2017, Chris Horn

An innovative program at the Richland County Sheriff’s Department aims to prevent post-traumatic stress disorder among its officers — and change the culture in law enforcement that makes it difficult to ask for help.

erin holmes

A hand up

July 06, 2017, Melinda Waldrop

After a year-and-a-half of work, Carolina graduate student Derek Bedenbaugh is a chapter away from finishing his dissertation examining disability and gender roles in 19th century British literature. Bedenbaugh’s journey to that momentous occasion has been made smoother thanks to the Bilinski Educational Foundation.

Sharon DeWitte

Black Death's detective

June 28, 2017, Peggy Binette

Armed with a new NSF grant, anthropologist Sharon DeWitte is embarking on research that builds on nearly 15 years of studying the Black Death and will create a new approach to understanding a population’s vulnerability to infectious disease. UofSC caught up with DeWitte to discuss how she decodes death.

American cemetery in Normandy

Remembering D-Day through film and stories

May 23, 2017, Megan Sexton

D-Day will be marked in early June with parades and commemorations along the beaches in northern France. University of South Carolina alumnus Wade Sellers will be there, too, on the independent filmmaker’s third trip to the French coast. This time, he’ll be screening the film he directed and edited, “Return to Normandy,” in the primetime slot at the Normandy-World War II International Film Festival.

awards day

Top students honored at annual Awards Day ceremony

April 20, 2017, Mary-Kathryn Craft

Three graduating seniors received the university's highest honors at the annual Awards Day ceremony. Jory Mackenzie Fleming and Megan Patricia O’Brien received Algernon Sydney Sullivan awards, the university’s top honor for undergraduates, and Cory Cambridge Alpert received the Steven N. Swanger award, the university’s second-highest undergraduate honor.

Michael Senatore

Michael Senatore bottle flips into TEDx Carnegie Mellon

March 30, 2017, Abigayle Morrison

While some Gamecocks played on the national stage for basketball this weekend for the Final Four in Phoenix and Dallas, freshman political science major Michael Senatore stepped on a stage of a different sort. On Saturday (April 1), Senatore gave a TEDx talk at Carnegie Mellon University on how he made the science of flipping a water bottle a national phenomenon.

beasley

Planting a love of learning

March 27, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

A self-proclaimed “outdoorsy” person, Todd Beasley started his own small business at just 10 years old gardening for other families in his neighborhood. Now three decades later, the College of Education alumnus is the new director of programs at one of the largest botanical gardens in the country — the San Antonio Botanical Gardens.

Stanley Nelson

Civil rights filmmaker Stanley Nelson to visit UofSC

March 23, 2017, Peggy Binette

Award-winning civil rights documentary filmmaker Stanley Nelson Jr. will visit the University of South Carolina March 29-31 to preview his latest documentary and give a series of public talks. We caught up with Nelson to discuss some of the topics he'll explore with university faculty, staff and students.

clovis extinction

UofSC discovery of widespread platinum may help solve Clovis people mystery

March 08, 2017, Peggy Binette

No one knows for certain why the Clovis people and iconic beasts -- mastodon, mammoth and saber-toothed tiger – living some 12,800 years ago suddenly disappeared. However, a discovery of widespread platinum at archaeological sites across the United States by three University of South Carolina archaeologists has provided an important clue in solving this enduring mystery. The research findings are outlined in a new study released Thursday (March 9) in Scientific Reports, a publication of Nature.

spring

Celebrate spring at Carolina

March 02, 2017, Peggy Binette

There’s no better place in Columbia to enjoy spring than the University of South Carolina and its iconic Horseshoe. To officially usher in the season, My Carolina Alumni Association is hosting two public events: A historic Horseshoe tour and reception with University Archivist Elizabeth West on March 9 and an evening of Southern heirloom foods and culture with Carolina Distinguished Professor David Shields on March 16.

heidi brooks

DC at 25: Heidi Brooks, alumna

January 10, 2017, Craig Brandhorst

The Washington Semester Program celebrates its 25th anniversary of providing full-time, semester-long internships at congressional offices, federal agencies, nonprofits and other D.C.-based organizations. In the last of our series of stories talking to alumni and current participants in the program, we talk to alumna Heidi Brooks, chief operating offering of the Schott Foundation for Public Education.

adam reiss

Why the universe is accelerating

January 10, 2017, Chris Horn

Nearly 90 years ago, astronomer Edwin Hubble discovered that the universe is expanding. Now we know, thanks to research by Adam Riess and other scientists, that this cosmic expansion is speeding up. The Nobel-winning astrophysicist will explain the phenomenon of a faster-expanding universe in a Jan. 17 public lecture at Carolina.

allison marsh

Allison Marsh: Public History in 3D

January 06, 2017, Craig Brandhorst

If you want to break down the traditional classroom wall, look no further than public history, a discipline with one foot outside the academy already. Ask Allison Marsh, director of the University of South Carolina’s public history program, whose forays into the virtual world bring an added dimension to online learning and whose real world “classroom” stretches from the Carolina campus to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

medina

DC at 25: Kimberly Medina, senior

January 02, 2017, Craig Brandhorst

The Washington Semester Program celebrates its 25th anniversary of providing full-time, semester-long internships at congressional offices, federal agencies, nonprofits and other D.C.-based organizations. In our series of stories talking to alumni and current participants in the program, we talk to Kimberly Medina, a senior political science and international studies major.

Year end review

Twenty-Sixteen: By the Letters

December 15, 2016, USC Times

A is for alphabet, at least according to USC Times. To help close out 2016, the University of South Carolina’s monthly magazine for faculty and staff devoted its entire December issue to the ABCs of 2016 — with each letter representing a different accomplishment, announcement or notable arrival from the past year.

sc encyclopedia

SC Encyclopedia off the shelf and on the web

December 14, 2016, Page Ivey

If you’re of a certain age, you might remember the row of dusty encyclopedias in your parents’ den — books that were the Google of their day but limited in what they could convey. Now you can open the “South Carolina Encyclopedia” and hear Dizzy Gillespie talk about be-bop or watch qualifying for a 1970s Southern 500 stock car race. That’s because the encyclopedia has gone digital.

katie schwichtenberg

DC at 25: Katie Schwichtenberg, senior

December 12, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

The Washington Semester Program celebrates its 25th anniversary of providing full-time, semester-long internships at congressional offices, federal agencies, nonprofits and other D.C.-based organizations. In our series of stories talking to alumni and current participants in the program, we talk to Katie Schwichtenberg, a senior political science and history major.

talbot brewer

Understanding the humanities and happiness with Talbot Brewer

December 07, 2016, Peggy Binette

What are the keys to happiness? What is the meaning of life? Philosopher and University of Virginia professor Talbot Brewer will discuss how to find these answers in the humanities in a public talk Dec. 14. The event is offered as part of a $2.1 million funded grant project titled, “Virtue, Happiness and the Meaning of Life,” which is co-directed by Carolina philosopher Jennifer Frey.

Greg Ferrante

DC at 25: Greg Ferrante, alumnus

November 29, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

The Washington Semester Program celebrates its 25th anniversary of providing full-time, semester-long internships at congressional offices, federal agencies, nonprofits and other D.C.-based organizations. In the second of our series of stories talking to alumni and current participants in the program, we talk to program alumnus Greg Ferrante, Chief financial officer, Global Policy and Advocacy Division, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; chair of the audit and finance committee of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Old, new friendships bring acclaimed illustrator's works to UofSC

November 04, 2016, Dan Cook

Anita Lobel, the acclaimed author and illustrator of children’s books, will be honored with the Thomas Cooper Society Medal in recognition of her contribution to the arts on Nov. 17. The award comes as part of Lobel's burgeoning ties to the university — and her longstanding friendship with two alumnae.

post_image_kari_croft

It's all about the kids

October 25, 2016, Dan Cook

Some teachers run from struggling students, but 2009 alumna Kari Croft has staked her career on trying to help them. Now she has a $10 million grant to establish RISE High, a charter school in Los Angeles aimed at serving students who are homeless, in foster care or facing other challenges that make it difficult for them to attend traditional schools.

Sara Schwebel has edited and published a critical edition of

English professor, students shed new light on 1960 children's classic

October 19, 2016, Lynn Schutte

Scott O’Dell’s 1960 book “Island of the Blue Dolphins” has been a classroom favorite, despite some potentially controversial elements. The University of South Carolina’s Sara Schwebel, associate professor of English, is working to help explain that controversy. With the help of students, Schwebel has edited and published a critical edition of the book, complete with an introduction and essays to help place the narrative in its correct historical and cultural context.

michael dowdy

Expanding the literary canon

October 09, 2016, Chris Horn

For Michael Dowdy, there’s a familiar ring to this year’s political rhetoric about border walls and deportation of Latinos. “Latinos have a different story than most in coming to the United States and a unique perspective on the American dream,” says Dowdy, a recently appointed associate professor whose specialty is Latino literature and poetry.

Andrew Pingitore and Julia Pribyl

Losing green up the stack

September 01, 2016, Steven Powell

With as much as $175,000 in potential annual savings for just one building on campus, a group of graduate students kicked off an energy conservation initiative in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry last week. It draws attention to how much energy is literally blown out of ventilation stacks every year by a common laboratory fixture: the fume hood.

swamp fox

21st century fox hunt

August 23, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

Archaeologist Steve Smith is continuing to pursue his lifelong fascination with one of South Carolina’s most famous Revolutionaries, Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox. Smith and colleagues are investigating Fort Motte, the Colonial plantation where Marion and “Light Horse” Harry Lee won a major victory against the British.

Andrew Greytak

Nanotechnology you can see

August 22, 2016, Steven Powell

Consumers are getting a dose of something new with quantum dots, a nanomaterial that is rendering particularly rich colors on some recently released TVs, computer displays and e-readers. The department of chemistry and biochemistry’s Andrew Greytak, an innovator in the field, is working to push the nanotechnology’s reach even further.

Delving into drought

August 01, 2016, Dan Cook

With South Carolina still recovering from last October’s historic floods, it might seem incongruous to study drought. But this state has faced serious drought in the past — and it will again. Enter the the Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessment team, which works to improve our understanding of drought over time and space.