Recent Stories

Dr. Ross

A thousand passions, 1 heartbeat

October 20, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

University of South Carolina College of Education alumnus and Chapin High School principal, Akil Ross, was named the 2018 National Principal of the Year on Friday, October 20. The honor is the culmination of a passionate career as an educator that began just a few miles away from our campus 16 years ago.

Lava flows in the Galapagos

Gamecocks in the Galápagos

October 16, 2017, Allen Wallace

For the second year in a row, UofSC is taking students to one of the rarest classrooms in the world: the Galapagos Islands. The cross-disciplinary study abroad program offers diverse lessons, but the overarching theme is sustainability.

Brandon Harrison in class

Advancing educational equity for African-American children

October 11, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Rapping the words to the U.S. Constitution might seem odd — unless you’re a student in one of Brandon Harrison’s classes. Harrison, and other public school teachers, are collaborating with education professors here at Carolina to identify which methods work best when teaching African-American students.

Binda in Senegal

From refugee to global education advocate

September 22, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

At just 6 years old, Noella “Binda” Niati was forced to flee her home in the Democratic Republic of Congo, amid intense violence and political upheaval. More than two decades later, she is headed back to Africa to study ways to encourage children, especially girls, to stay in school longer.

advanced materials

Advancing SC workforce

September 19, 2017

The University of South Carolina has been preparing students for the workforce for generations. As the state has attracted more high-tech manufacturing operations, the need for more skilled workers has grown rapidly. The university can now increase its reach to help even more South Carolinians take advantage of these opportunities with a $20 million National Science Foundation grant.

jeffries

When tracking math students doesn't add up

July 21, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Education professor Rhonda Jeffries and graduate student Hope Reed wanted to close the achievement gap for underrepresented students, specifically those tracked to be in remedial classes. So, they took a risk with a group of freshman students at Blythewood High School and conducted a secret experiment of sorts that proved to be powerful.

Student works on reading

The hidden parents of South Carolina

June 26, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Raised by a Cuban father and Colombian mother in Boston, Massachusetts, Julia López-Robertson experienced first-hand the challenges that come with being a member of an underrepresented population in America. Now as a professor in the College of Education, she is helping other Latino families through her research and outreach.

pastides family

Full circle

May 13, 2017, Page Ivey

For university President Harris Pastides, receiving the Ellis Island Medal of Honor is like coming full circle for the son of Greek immigrants who left their idyllic Mediterranean island home in search of better life for their children.

Stanley Nelson

Civil rights filmmaker Stanley Nelson to visit UofSC

March 23, 2017, Peggy Binette

Award-winning civil rights documentary filmmaker Stanley Nelson Jr. will visit the University of South Carolina March 29-31 to preview his latest documentary and give a series of public talks. We caught up with Nelson to discuss some of the topics he'll explore with university faculty, staff and students.

chelsea evans

South Carolina Law Review elects first black woman editor-in-chief

March 01, 2017, Peggy Binette

For the first time in its 69-year history the South Carolina Law Review has elected an African American to serve as its editor-in-chief. Chelsea Evans, a second-year law student from North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, was elected by peers to lead the esteemed University of South Carolina School of Law publication.  

mentoring

Lean on me

February 06, 2017

There’s no question that having a good mentor can help shape an individual’s career — especially in the field of law. That’s why the University of South Carolina School of Law has devoted substantial resources to take its mentoring program to a new level.

richard t. greener

UofSC to celebrate legacy of Richard T. Greener

January 25, 2017, Peggy Binette

Monday (Jan. 30) marks the birthday of Richard T. Greener, the University of South Carolina’s first African-American professor. The university will commemorate Greener on his 173rd birthday at 4 p.m. in the program room of the Hollings Special Collections Library, where a 2-foot model of a statue of Greener will be unveiled. The memorial statue, which will be located outside the university’s Thomas Cooper Library, will be unveiled this fall.

inspired teaching

Inspired teaching

January 03, 2017, Chris Horn

Helping faculty members build online and blended courses is only one aspect of the Center for Teaching Excellence, an initiative the university launched 10 years ago as part of a broader effort to enhance student learning by fostering a culture of effective and innovative teaching.

smithwick

PASOs: Step by step

September 20, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

Julie Smithwick began laying the groundwork for PASOs as part of a field placement project for her master’s in social work in 2005. Now based at the Arnold School of Public Health, the statewide organization provides health care education and resource navigation to 8,500 Latinos a year and boasts a budget of $1.3 million.

eboni nelson

Engineering equality

July 18, 2016

The legal profession has been called one of the least diverse in the country. And while countless attempts have been made within the legal industry to ameliorate the problem, University of South Carolina School of Law professor Eboni Nelson believes the key to real change starts with law schools.

Sophie Keyes

Student puts disability access center stage

June 10, 2016, Erin Mikes

Broadcast journalism major Sophie Keyes will place the public need for greater disability access center stage when she competes in the Miss South Carolina pageant in late June. Inspired by her father’s work and her friend’s need for greater wheelchair access, the senior from Clinton, South Carolina, has made disability access the focus of her platform as she competes in pageants.

students with the program director of MAPP

There's a M.A.P.P. for that

May 16, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

Like many new college students, Tamaragail Tarrant, Trevor Prioleau and Kennette Smalls came to the University of South Carolina with few connections and plenty of nervous energy. Navigating a campus the size of UofSC can be intimidating, and all three students describe themselves as shy, whether or not they seem that way when you meet them. Luckily, the three got involved with the university’s Multicultural Assistance Peer Program, a peer-to-peer student mentoring program for students with multicultural backgrounds, and found everything they need to fit in, have fun and get the most from their college experience.

greener statue

Deconstructing Reconstruction

April 14, 2016, Peggy Binette

Reconstruction was the first chapter in America’s civil rights movement. And its influence on race relations continues across the country and on college campuses, although few may realize its connection. Now 150 years later, the University of South Carolina’s History Center and Historic Columbia hopes to deepen public understanding of Reconstruction’s history and racial legacy with a symposium April 21–22.

Marjorie Spruill

Divided we stand

March 17, 2016, Peggy Binette

History professor Marjorie Spruill will give a public talk about how the events that divided American women in the 1970s are connected to the polarized politics that has gripped America since 1980. Her talk, which will take place at 6 p.m. March 22 in Capstone House, is based on forthcoming book with Bloomsbury Press, titled “Divided We Stand: Women’s Rights, Family Values & the Polarization of American Politics.”

Anita Singleton-Prather

Sacred music and Gullah culture showcased this weekend

February 22, 2016, Glenn Hare

Noted Gullah storyteller and singer Anita Singleton-Prather, along with the Gullah Kinfolk, will share stories and songs at “Shared Traditions: Sacred Music in the South,” a two-day symposium featuring shape-note singing, African-American spirituals and other music traditions unique to the South. The symposium starts with a meet-and-greet with Singleton-Prather at 3:30 p.m. Friday (Feb. 26) in the McKissick Museum on the historic Horseshoe.

Alysha baratta

A passion for social justice

January 19, 2016, Peggy Binette

Civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. said, “The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character — that is the goal of true education.” Four individuals, emboldened by King to ensure social, political and economic equality for all people, were honored by the University of South Carolina for their community service and social justice work at the annual MLK commemoration breakfast.

CCCR undergraduate research

Opening doors

September 25, 2015, Steven Powell

The words ‘summer’ and ‘vacation’ go together like peanut butter and jelly for a lot of college students, but in the famously hot months the University of South Carolina offers meatier sandwiches than that on its academic menu. This summer the university’s Center for Colon Cancer Research brought undergraduates from around the country into a brand-new biomedical research experience.