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Advancing SC workforce

September 19, 2017

The University of South Carolina has been preparing students for the workforce for generations. As the state has attracted more high-tech manufacturing operations, the need for more skilled workers has grown rapidly. The university can now increase its reach to help even more South Carolinians take advantage of these opportunities with a $20 million National Science Foundation grant.

eclipse

Countdown to totality

August 10, 2017, Jalena James

Solar eclipses have long captured people’s imaginations throughout the ages, and the university will host special events dedicated to exploring the historical fascination surrounding such astronomical events Aug. 17-21.

Sharon DeWitte

Black Death's detective

June 28, 2017, Peggy Binette

Armed with a new NSF grant, anthropologist Sharon DeWitte is embarking on research that builds on nearly 15 years of studying the Black Death and will create a new approach to understanding a population’s vulnerability to infectious disease. UofSC caught up with DeWitte to discuss how she decodes death.

Student works on reading

The hidden parents of South Carolina

June 26, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Raised by a Cuban father and Colombian mother in Boston, Massachusetts, Julia López-Robertson experienced first-hand the challenges that come with being a member of an underrepresented population in America. Now as a professor in the College of Education, she is helping other Latino families through her research and outreach.

USMC Film Repository's new home opens

May 26, 2017, John Brunelli

University President Harris Pastides and Thomas McNally, dean of University Libraries dedicate the John S. Davis Scanning Center and the Lt. Col. James H. Davis Film Vault at the Libraries' Moving Image Research Collections. The MIRC facility is the new home of the U.S. Marine Corps Film Repository that chronicles the corps from the 1940s to the 1970s.

nsf grant

USC researchers land $1.3 million grant to enhance STEM education

May 03, 2017, Kathryn McPhail

Researchers from the School of Medicine and College of Education recently received a $1.3 million National Science Foundation grant to study the best ways to encourage students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) through participation at informal learning sites.

joe_toomb_china

From Carolina to ... anywhere

April 21, 2017, Dan Cook

Last year, some 1,700 undergraduates studied abroad — a 15 percent increase. The quick jump is just one aspect of the increasing internationalization of the University of South Carolina, a coordinated effort led by Global Carolina, a strategic initiative launched two years ago.

Sarah Gehlert

New dean named for College of Social Work

April 11, 2017, John Brunelli

The University of South Carolina has named Sarah Gehlert as the dean of the College of Social Work. Gehlert comes to Carolina from Washington University in St. Louis, where she was the E. Desmond Lee Professor of Racial and Ethnic Diversity.

arnold school treadmill

Arnold School of Public Health to expand to Greenville

March 24, 2017, Jeff Stensland

The University of South Carolina’s nationally-renowned Arnold School of Public Health will open a satellite program in Greenville focused on research and education that tackles some of South Carolina’s most pressing health needs. The expansion will allow students to receive graduate-level education at the intersection of public health and clinical medicine and conduct cutting-edge research into solutions to public health problems.

Norma Frizzell

Breakthrough Star: Norma Frizzell

March 24, 2017, Chris Horn

If a key component in a car goes bad, the car won’t go for long. That’s roughly what happens in the human body when mutations and other insults disrupt the mitochondria, the essential energy-making components of human cells. Norma Frizzell has devoted much of her career to understanding how and why mitochondria go haywire and sometimes lead to fatal maladies.

clovis extinction

UofSC discovery of widespread platinum may help solve Clovis people mystery

March 08, 2017, Peggy Binette

No one knows for certain why the Clovis people and iconic beasts -- mastodon, mammoth and saber-toothed tiger – living some 12,800 years ago suddenly disappeared. However, a discovery of widespread platinum at archaeological sites across the United States by three University of South Carolina archaeologists has provided an important clue in solving this enduring mystery. The research findings are outlined in a new study released Thursday (March 9) in Scientific Reports, a publication of Nature.

Living and experiencing the world leads to international award

January 11, 2017, Adena Rice

Living and experiencing different parts of the world gave Stefanie Feltwell, an international business and economics senior, a competitive edge to receive one of just 12 Women in Business scholarships from the Zonta International Foundation. Feltwell has used the global and leadership experience she gained at the University of South Carolina to develop her passion for helping others into a future career in international policy and global development.

adam reiss

Why the universe is accelerating

January 10, 2017, Chris Horn

Nearly 90 years ago, astronomer Edwin Hubble discovered that the universe is expanding. Now we know, thanks to research by Adam Riess and other scientists, that this cosmic expansion is speeding up. The Nobel-winning astrophysicist will explain the phenomenon of a faster-expanding universe in a Jan. 17 public lecture at Carolina.

Year end review

Twenty-Sixteen: By the Letters

December 15, 2016, USC Times

A is for alphabet, at least according to USC Times. To help close out 2016, the University of South Carolina’s monthly magazine for faculty and staff devoted its entire December issue to the ABCs of 2016 — with each letter representing a different accomplishment, announcement or notable arrival from the past year.

sc encyclopedia

SC Encyclopedia off the shelf and on the web

December 14, 2016, Page Ivey

If you’re of a certain age, you might remember the row of dusty encyclopedias in your parents’ den — books that were the Google of their day but limited in what they could convey. Now you can open the “South Carolina Encyclopedia” and hear Dizzy Gillespie talk about be-bop or watch qualifying for a 1970s Southern 500 stock car race. That’s because the encyclopedia has gone digital.

Brittany VanderBeek

A revolutionary rivalry

November 18, 2016, Jo Jo Winkelmann

Graduate business student Brittany VanderBeek was put on a project of epic proportions during her internship at Michelin: Bring Carolina and Clemson students together to help reduce waste at a tire manufacturer. Next semester, the first joint class of students will begin working on solutions thanks to VanderBeek's hard work.

Sara Schwebel has edited and published a critical edition of

English professor, students shed new light on 1960 children's classic

October 19, 2016, Lynn Schutte

Scott O’Dell’s 1960 book “Island of the Blue Dolphins” has been a classroom favorite, despite some potentially controversial elements. The University of South Carolina’s Sara Schwebel, associate professor of English, is working to help explain that controversy. With the help of students, Schwebel has edited and published a critical edition of the book, complete with an introduction and essays to help place the narrative in its correct historical and cultural context.

michael dowdy

Expanding the literary canon

October 09, 2016, Chris Horn

For Michael Dowdy, there’s a familiar ring to this year’s political rhetoric about border walls and deportation of Latinos. “Latinos have a different story than most in coming to the United States and a unique perspective on the American dream,” says Dowdy, a recently appointed associate professor whose specialty is Latino literature and poetry.

after the flood

After the Flood: Weathering the storm

October 02, 2016, Steven Powell

Immediately following the October 2015 flood in South Carolina, USC researchers began looking at issues related to the once-in-a-lifetime catastrophe. In Part 5 of our "after the flood" series, we look at the flood's impact on the state's coastal estuaries. The SC Floods Conference, initially scheduled for Friday (Oct. 7), has been postponed due to Hurricane Matthew.

smithwick

PASOs: Step by step

September 20, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

Julie Smithwick began laying the groundwork for PASOs as part of a field placement project for her master’s in social work in 2005. Now based at the Arnold School of Public Health, the statewide organization provides health care education and resource navigation to 8,500 Latinos a year and boasts a budget of $1.3 million.

Andrew Pingitore and Julia Pribyl

Losing green up the stack

September 01, 2016, Steven Powell

With as much as $175,000 in potential annual savings for just one building on campus, a group of graduate students kicked off an energy conservation initiative in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry last week. It draws attention to how much energy is literally blown out of ventilation stacks every year by a common laboratory fixture: the fume hood.

swamp fox

21st century fox hunt

August 23, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

Archaeologist Steve Smith is continuing to pursue his lifelong fascination with one of South Carolina’s most famous Revolutionaries, Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox. Smith and colleagues are investigating Fort Motte, the Colonial plantation where Marion and “Light Horse” Harry Lee won a major victory against the British.

Andrew Greytak

Nanotechnology you can see

August 22, 2016, Steven Powell

Consumers are getting a dose of something new with quantum dots, a nanomaterial that is rendering particularly rich colors on some recently released TVs, computer displays and e-readers. The department of chemistry and biochemistry’s Andrew Greytak, an innovator in the field, is working to push the nanotechnology’s reach even further.

Julius Fridriksson

Brains on the brain

August 03, 2016, Craig Brandhorst

Aphasia, a communication disorder caused by damage to the left hemisphere of the brain, robs people of their ability to process language. A team of researchers led by SmartState Endowed Chair of Memory and Brain Function Julius Fridriksson is using state-of-the-art MRI, machine learning and new therapies to help those people find their words again.